The Food Combining System

Most of the food combining rules were first set down long ago by such Hygienic pioneers as Doctors John H. Tilden and William Howard Hay, and they have been tested in practice by modern Hygienic doctors and many thousands of lay people. This empirical testing has resulted in some modifications of the original food combining principles. Other modifications continue to be evaluated as “gray” areas and are studied and tested.

What is needed by neophytes and old-timers alike is accurate, up-to-date information, clarification, simplification and a common-sense approach—a way to eliminate confusion and anxiety.

This lesson discusses meal-planning principles and their application. You will be given all the details you will need in order to learn to apply these principles. This lesson will also lead you through numerous examples of the correct application of each of the food combining rules that were discussed in Lesson 22.

Planning Meals

Meal planning advice is intended merely as a guide to enable the individual to work out his own menus. The object is to understand the principles of food combining so that you (and your students) will be independent and never at a loss, no matter where, in preparing meals from the foods at hand.

Food availability varies with location, season, climate, altitude, soil and market factors. If you know how to combine your foods correctly, you may usually select compatible combinations anywhere—at the market, at the home of a friend or relative, or even at a public eating place. An intelligent adult should learn these principles and learn to apply them. Soon the practice becomes habitual—almost automatic.

We will start with an outline of how to plan your daily food program.

If you have Dr. Shelton’s book, Food Combining Made Easy, you will notice (pp. 55-57) that his daily menus usually include a breakfast of fruit, a starch meal for lunch, and a protein meal for dinner. He even includes such items as lamb chops and eggs on some of the menus (simply to show how to combine animal products, if you use them).

My daily menus (in this lesson) will also include three meals, even though it is best to eat only two meals on most ( days. Many people do better with two meals daily, some do better alternating between two and three meals (two meals one day, three meals the next, etc.).

On days that you eat two meals, you may use the menus as a guide, selecting two meals each day from the variety offered. I would suggest selecting one fruit meal and one salad meal, being sure to include enough protein foods, according to your needs.

My menus will not advocate the use of a starch and a protein every day. My recommendation is to have some concentrated protein most days, and salad every day. Some people get along quite well with concentrated protein every other day, others need some every day. The amount of concentrated protein you need depends on how much you take at each sitting, your tolerance, and the efficiency of your assimilation. How much concentrated protein you need also depends on whether you are eating all raw food.

The proteins to be found in almost all vegetables and many fruits, though usually not concentrated, are of high biological value when eaten unchanged (without cooking), and are an important source of dietary protein. People on all-raw-food diets may need less concentrated protein, but it is an individual matter. Your own needs may best be ascertained through personal experimentation.

On the other hand, people who eat some cooked starches and cooked combination foods should realize that these are supplementary sources of dietary protein, and that it may not be necessary to also use concentrated proteins on every day when concentrated starches or combination foods are used. Again, this is an individual matter.

But four ounces of nuts or seeds at one meal, a serving of brown rice at another meal, and a serving of dates at a third meal on the same day, may easily result in overburdening the body with too many concentrated foods, and too much protein.

How much concentrated protein you need is also dependent on another extremely important factor. How active are you? How much regular vigorous exercise are you getting? Everyone should make it a point to use the body energetically every day. People who engage in little physical exertion need less food, particularly less protein. Sedentary people who consume more food, especially more protein, than their bodies are capable of metabolizing efficiently, are incubating future serious pathological problems.

I find that I personally need to take some concentrated protein almost every day. I usually can eat only two ounces of nuts and/or seeds at a sitting, supplementing my protein needs at other meals with other lower protein foods, such as large green salads and avocados. I use alfalfa sprouts with almost every salad meal, and sometimes use lentil and mung bean sprouts.

My recommendation includes a program that does not utilize concentrated starches or combination foods (whether raw, sprouted or cooked) more than four or five times weekly. You will note that the menus which include some cooked food indicate cooked foods not more than four times weekly. It is hoped that cooked foods will gradually be de-emphasized even more.

I am not, by any means, saying that Dr. Shelton’s fruit-starch-protein daily menus may not be applicable to some people, nor am I saying that some people may not use more fruit and less concentrated foods than are included in these menus. I am simply offering suggested alternatives, determined through research and practical experience of many years and by many people.

Study the daily menus in this lesson, compare them with Dr. Shelton’s and others, if you wish and determine, by experimentation, which daily meal plan is best for you.

Your Daily Food Program

Breakfast: Starting with breakfast, you have three ways to go, with many variations of these three basic choices. The first choice—the best choice for most people—is the “no-breakfast plan.” That would mean you would be eating only twice daily.

juice

The second choice is a light breakfast of one kind of juicy fruit—citrus or melon or any subacid fruit, such as grapes—no dried fruit. Fresh fruits are the best choice for the first food of the day—one or two varieties. They should be eaten whole, uncooked and unjuiced. Eat until pleasantly satisfied, not stuffed. Three to five oranges, or a grapefruit and two oranges, or one-eighth of a medium watermelon, or a medium cantaloupe or honeydew melon, or one pound of grapes, should be maximum amounts for an all-fruit first meal of the day. Most people would want less.

The third breakfast choice is for people who find that they do better with a more substantial breakfast. This is preferred by some men (and also a few women), and especially by individuals who will be away from home during the day and will perhaps be unable to obtain good food conveniently. This plan might also be preferred by those who find that they feel better if they eat some protein early in the day—notably, people who might have the problem of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). However, many people who have had hypoglycemia (or have been diagnosed as hypoglycemics) have successfully progressed to the two-meal-a-day plan.

This more substantial breakfast might consist of citrus or other acid fruit, such as pineapple or strawberries followed by raw, unsalted nuts and/or seeds. It might be advisable to wait thirty minutes or longer before eating the nuts, to allow the sugars in the fruit a chance to leave the stomach. This is a precaution often taken by people with impaired digestions. Maximum amounts of fruit in such a meal should be about half the quantities used when eating only the fruit. Two to four ounces of nuts and/or seeds may be used. Lettuce and/or celery would be an excellent addition to this meal.

This type of more substantial breakfast, or brunch, might be more advantageously used around noon, rather than early in the morning, if the circumstances permit, and if you are willing to postpone eating until after you have done something to “earn” your meal.

Luncheon: Now we get to luncheon, where we again have multiple choices. Even if you have not eaten breakfast, you might prefer to have a lunch of juicy fruit or melon. If you choose melon (most people do better with melon only, only one kind) eat as much as you want, but stop before you are uncomfortably full. Some people have no problem when combining more than one kind of melon, or combining melon with certain subacid fruits. (See Lesson 22.)

If you decide on a mixed fruit lunch, this is an excellent and satisfying meal, if you are careful about the combinations. You should not use acid fruit with sweet fruit; for example, don’t use oranges and bananas at the same meal. Your mixed fruit lunch could consist of grapes, peaches, apples or other fresh subacid fruit—one or two varieties (two or three pieces)—plus one or two bananas and/or one-half of a medium avocado. It is better to choose either the bananas or the avocado. Lettuce and celery also make an excellent addition to this meal, especially if you are including avocado.

If desired, you could also have a small serving of figs, dates, raisins, soaked dried apricots, or other dried fruit, if you have not had avocado. Or you could occasionally have acid or subacid fruit, lettuce and celery, and four ounces of cheese, if you use it. If you do use cheese, use it sparingly and rarely. Actually, lettuce and celery may be used with almost any fruit meal, but I would not recommend their use with melon.

Another type of luncheon, especially if you have had a fruit or melon breakfast, would be a salad meal. You could have as much salad as you want, consisting of one or more dark green varieties of lettuce: Romaine, Boston, Bibb, leaf, or any garden lettuce (not pale iceberg head lettuce), plus tomatoes, cucumber, celery, or any nonstarchy vegetables, along with or followed by avocado or nuts or seeds.

The Evening Meal: New we get to the evening meal, where the choices are almost infinite. Much depends on what you have already eaten. If you have already eaten your fill at breakfast and lunch, you need very little additional food, perhaps none.

If you ate a citrus and nuts breakfast, and a salad and avocado lunch, you might want a mixed fruit supper. If you had a fruit or melon breakfast and a salad and nuts lunch, you might want a salad and avocado supper. If you have not yet had any nuts that day, you could have salad and nuts for supper.

If you are still using cooked food, it is better to eat it in the evening, after the day’s work is done, when you may rest and relax, and accomplish better digestion. Many people have a tendency to overeat of the cooked food—so eat a large salad first; this may help you to eat more conservative amounts of cooked food. Try to avoid second helpings, and stop before you feel stuffed. In any event, it is preferable to eat raw food before cooked food, juicy food before dry food, and easy-to-digest food before foods that need more time for digestion (such as starches, proteins and fats).

Sequence of Eating

It is true that all the food will be mixed in the stomach, but the so-called “Ideal Order of Eating” is helpful to some extent.

Eat raw food before cooked food. Raw foods contain live enzymes, which influence digestive efficiency; cooking destroys all enzymes. Moreover, the consumption of raw foods stimulates gastric enzyme secretion, which is necessary to initiate good digestion. Besides, the more raw foods eaten as the first course, the less cooked foods will be eaten.

Eat juicy foods before dry foods. During the process of digestion, hydrolysis occurs—that is, the combining of the food with liquid from the body’s reserve supply. Juicy foods contain some of their own liquid, which facilitates the initial processing of the food mixture. (Do not take water with dry foods as an alternative—this causes problems—see Rules for Drinking.)

Eat easy-to-digest foods before foods, that require a longer digestion time. The digestive process starts while the meal is being consumed, and the most liquid portion of the food mixture, the chyme, leaves the stomach at intervals. Thus, some of the easy-to-digest foods may be processed and leave the stomach before the end of the meal. Even if this does not occur, if the concentrated foods are eaten last, you may possibly eat less of them, which would be an advantage for many people, especially those who have a tendency to overeat of the concentrated proteins and starches.

An exception may advantageously be made in the case of eating salad alternately with nuts, rather than consecutively. Many people find that eating the salad along with the nuts actually aids digestion, and also eliminates the dry or thirsty feeling that sometimes follows the eating of nuts after the salad. Do not use the tomato or lettuce to moisten the nuts to help get them down. The nuts must be thoroughly chewed.

Dr. Vetrano’s article on the “Sequence of Eating” indicates that she does not attach importance to the sequence of eating concentrated foods and less concentrated foods. You might want to experiment to determine your own preference.

When combining several fruits at a meal, it is a good idea to eat the sweetest variety last. (Oranges after grapefruit; bananas, persimmons, dates, figs, after grapes, plums, apples etc.) If you follow a sweet fruit with one that is less sweet, the comparison actually seems to make the less sweet fruit usually taste acid or sour.

On the other hand, I sometimes like to eat a small amount of subacid fruit after the sweet fruit to dilute the excessively sweet taste at the end of the meal. Either way, there is no food combining principle involved—please yourself.

If you sometimes would like to eat fruit in combination with a mixed vegetable meal, the best way would be to eat the fruit first, and then, if possible, delay at least fifteen minutes before eating the other foods, starting with the salad.

As previously indicated, exceptions to this arbitrary “eating order” are not serious. After all, it does all go into the same stomach, and is quickly combined into a mobile mixture, the chyme.

Rules for Drinking

Drink no beverage except pure water, only when thirsty, and not with meals, as drinking at meal time dilutes the digestive juices and retards digestion. Most beverages commonly consumed are loaded with harmful substances, interfere with the digestion and assimilation of foods, and may be addictive and destructive of vital organs.

No particular amount of water is necessary; thirst is the best guide. Hygienists usually drink very little water because no spices or seasonings are used, and there is so much liquid in foods as provided by nature. If thirsty, one may drink ten to twenty minutes before meals, one-half hour after a fruit meal, two hours after a vegetable or starch meal, and four hours after a protein meal. It is best to sip water, not gulp.

If one ignores the feeling of thirst that sometimes follows a meal and resists the impulse to drink, the thirst may soon disappear, having been satisfied by digestive secretions, and good digestion will be accomplished (since the digestive juices will not have been diluted). If very thirsty, and you feel that you must drink, try a few sips, instead of gulping large quantities of water. Drinking water with meals, or directly after meals, causes the stomach to dilate, and may lead to chronic indigestion, gastritis, ulcers, or even cancer.

Juices: Foods should not be juiced for use as a beverage, but should be eaten in their whole state. If exceptions to this rule are occasionally made, it should be with the full awareness that this fragmented food does not contribute anything “extra” to your health or nutrition, and is definitely a compromise of Hygienic principles.

In fact, this bombardment of the body with concentrated portions of fragmented foods may actually cause unpleasant, even serious problems. If carrot juice is consumed in large quantities, it may cause carotinemia and discolor the skin—the liver cannot handle too much of it. I have seen yellow palms (a symptom of carotinemia) that, fortunately, disappeared when the juicing habit was discontinued (prior to irreversible damage).

If you do insist on using juices, it would be best to follow the following guidelines: Never use large quantities of juiced foods and don’t use them as part of your regular food program. If you use juice occasionally, four to six ounces of vegetable juice may be taken twenty to thirty minutes before the evening meal at which a salad and, perhaps, some cooked food are eaten. Fruit juice— preferably fresh-made at home—may occasionally be used prior to a fruit meal. However, keep in mind that juices, either fruit or vegetable, are not beverages but fragmented foods.

The only time juices are indicated as part of a Hygienic program is when breaking a fast (though many people do very well in breaking a fast on whole fruit) or, very judiciously, as a temporary elimination diet. See Dr. Vetrano’s article “Mono-Eliminating Diets”. More details about the inadvisability of juicing foods will be given in a future lesson.

Pure water: The only beverage which should be used when thirsty is pure water. Avoid chlorinated city water, if you can. Don’t drink fluoridated water; do whatever you must to avoid it. Using fluoridated water in cooking is even worse, as it concentrates the fluorides, causing the water to be even less safe for use. Osteoporosis can occur from drinking fluoridated water. Sodium fluoride inactivates magnesium and some amino acids, and inhibits enzyme activity. Never drink artificially softened water because the miscellaneous inorganic minerals and impurities have been replaced by salt.

water

Minerals in water inhibit the absorption of the water. The minerals are inorganic substances and must be eliminated by the body. They are usually suspended particles of dirt and stone. These inorganic minerals are usable only by plants, which convert them to organic minerals, thus usable by man.

Professor Henry Sherman, in. his book. The Chemistry of Nutrition, says he doesn’t like to refer to such elements as calcium and iron as minerals, which may imply that they come directly from the mineral kingdom.

He says that these elements are usable by humans only when they occur organically in plant tissues—as complex, organized structures within the plant. This is the way in which these elements are adaptable to animal life, and this is the way we can make the best possible use of them.

Pure water from a rock spring is excellent; fresh rain water (if it could be gathered unpolluted) and distilled water are best. More detailed information about water, beverages and drinking are given in another lesson.

Modifications

People with efficient digestions can withstand modifications more freely; people with impaired digestions need to utilize as ideal an eating pattern as possible.

Cooked Foods

No cooked food could even come close to the nutritional value of foods which are used as they grow in the garden and orchard. If you do use some cooked foods, choose the best available and prepare them conservatively and correctly. Lessons 24, 25 and 26 will help in the selection, storage, preparation and serving of foods for the best nourishment. This lesson will simply provide a preliminary outline of foods which may be cooked.

The variety of acceptable cooked foods is quite extensive. It includes such meals as broccoli and lentils, or green beans and steamed or baked potatoes, or eggplant casserole, vegetable chop suey, a mixed vegetable casserole, or thick bean or vegetable soup. Baked parsnips, beets and carrots have a delightful sweet taste and need no seasonings. You may select globe artichokes, cauliflower or sweet corn—the choices are many.

Plain steamed vegetables need no seasoning if they are not overcooked; most vegetables cook in ten minutes or less. Casseroles may require some seasoning, but we use no salt or pepper. Season with parsley, celery or sweet bell pepper. Recipes for casseroles will be included in the lesson on food preparation.

The best way to use whole grains is to sprout them.

Even those people who cook some of their vegetables should try to use as many as possible in the raw state. Try young sweet corn or sweet potatoes uncooked. Ground (Jerusalem) artichokes are delicious raw. Raw young sweet peas or edible pod peas are delicious uncooked. In fact, the edible pod peas are a gourmet delight. Of course, all meals that include some cooked food should be preceded by a large raw salad.

Individual needs: The foregoing suggestions for meals including uncooked and cooked foods are generally applicable to people not suffering from serious pathological problems. This program may have to be adjusted in various ways to provide for the nutritional needs and capacities of those whose health is impaired. It is not necessary or advisable to try to conform to a “blueprint” program. Certain people may have emotional needs, or other reasons, for requiring other foods.

We must think in terms of careful consideration of the needs of the individual. It is important to see each person in relationship to his emotional as well as his physical needs, and in relationship to his total life situation.

Daily Menus

Salads

Eat as much salad as you want—but don’t stuff yourself. Use one or two varieties of lettuce from among the dark garden varieties, such as Romaine, Bibb, Boston, leaf or any garden lettuce (except iceberg). Endive or escarole may be included as a variety of lettuce, if it is not bitter.

In addition to the lettuce, choose two or three salad vegetables from among the following: celery, cabbage, cucumber, sweet pepper, or any young, tender greens (kale, turnip, dandelion, collard). Broccoli flowerets and leaves are particularly good salad vegetables. Cauliflower flowerets are also very good in the salad. Green beans, peas, chayote, zucchini or yellow summer squash are good choices when young and tender. Raw carrots or sweet potato may be used except with a protein meal; tomato may be used except with a starch meal.

Four Weeks of Menus

Two Weeks of All-Raw-Food Menus – First Week

Breakfast

Lunch

Supper

Sunday

Strawberries

Salad 

Raw sweet corn (young/tender)

 Raw carrots 

Alfalfa sprouts

Salad

Tomatoes 

Raw broccoli 

Macadamianuts

Mon​day

Oranges

Salad

Wheat or rye sprouts

Avocado

Salad

Tomatoes 

Alfalfa sprouts 

Almonds

Tuesday

Papaya

Lettuce 
Blueberries (or other subacid berries) 
Persimmons 
Fresh or dried figs

Salad 
Raw turnips 
Alfalfa sprouts 
Lentil sprouts

Wednesday

Cantaloupe

Lettuce, celery 
Pears 
Sweet plums 
Soaked dried apricots

Salad 
Tomatoes 
Raw zucchini squash 
Cashews

Thursday

Kiwi Fruit 
Filberts

Watermelon

Salad 
Alfalfa sprouts 
Edible pod peas 
Raw cauliflower or carrots Avocado

Friday

Fresh ripe
pineapple

Salad 
Alfalfa sprouts
Raw cauliflower
Jerusalem artichokes 
Avocado

Lettuce 
Peaches 
Papaya 
Bananas

Saturday

Casaba melon

Lettuce 
Grapes
Apricots
Dates

Salad 
Tomatoes 
Alfalfa sprouts 
Pecans

Menus Which Include Some Cooked Food – Second Week

BreakfastLunchSupper
SundayHoneydew melonSalad
Globe artichokes (raw) 
Steamed broccoli 
Alfalfa sprouts
Lettuce, celery
Strawberries
Cashews
MondayRaw fresh pineappleSalad  
Tomatoes Raw 
yellow squash 
Macadamia nuts
Celery
McIntosh apples
Plums
Avocado
TuesdayGrapefruit 
Almonds
Lettuce
Cherries 
Peaches 
Dried figs
Salad 
Alfalfa sprouts
Vegetable stew with garbanzo beans
WednesdayStrawberries 
Oranges
Salad 
Edible pod peas
 Sweet potato 
Avocado
Salad 
Tomatoes 
Alfalfa sprouts
Pecans
ThursdayKumquats 
Winesap apples
Lettuce, celery 
Grapes 
Bananas 
Soaked dried apricots
Salad 
Alfalfa sprouts
Steamed or baked butternut squash 
Green beans (raw or cooked)
FridayCantaloupeSalad 
Alfalfa sprouts 
Avocado
Salad
Tomatoes
Raw broccoli 
Almonds
SaturdayGrapefruit 
Oranges
Lettuce 
Golden Delicious apples 
Fresh figs 
Bananas
Salad
Alfalfa sprouts
Kasha 
(Buckwheat groats) or
(Wild rice casserole) or 
(Millet casserole)

Recap of Concentrated Foods in Sample Menus (Number of Times Used Each Week)

Raw Food MenusMenus With Some Cooked Food
First WeekSecond WeekFirst WeekSecond Week
Concentrated Protein/Fat
(Nuts and Seeds) 
Use 2 to 4 oz.
5655
Combination Foods
Starch/Protein
(Coconut, Lentil Sprouts, 
Lentils, Mung Bean Sprouts, 
Rice, Wild Rice, Kasha, 
English Peas, Garbanzo Beans)
1342
Starch foods
(Jerusalem Artichokes, Globe Artichokes, 
Corn, Carrots, Potatoes,  Sweet Potatoes) 
Use 1/2 to 3/4 cup
3213
Fat/Protein (Avocado)
Use up to 1/2 Medium Size
3343
Concentrated Sweet Fruits
(Dried Fruits)
Use sparingly, e.g. up to 8 dates
3222

Mono Meals And Mono Diets

Primitive man, in his pristine life in the forest, probably ate one food at a time, depending upon the availability of the food. Eating only one food at a meal is known as a monotrophic meal. If all meals over a period of time consist of a single food, such as oranges or grapes or watermelon, this would be called a monotrophic or “mono” diet.

Advantages of Mono Meals

There are advantages to the use of monotrophic meals, and it is recommended that at least the first meal of the day be a mono meal and preferably be of one kind of juicy fruit or melon. Obviously, the digestion of a mono meal would not be subject to the adaptation problems that are sometimes experienced (even to a minimal degree) when so-called compatible foods are combined. For instance,

even when several subacid fruits are combined, there may be subtle or overt differences in degrees of alkalinity or acidity, or in liquid or sugar content, or in digestion time. Most fruits lend themselves very well to monotrophic meals. It would be advantageous to program at least one mono meal daily—for the first food of the day.

Mono Diets Not Recommended for Regular Use

I do not endorse the use of a monotrophic diet for extended periods or regularly for several days every week, nor do I endorse the regular or extended use of a diet consisting of all monotrophic meals, i.e., each meal consisting of a single food, e.g., one kind of melon for one meal, grapes for another meal, romaine lettuce for another meal, alfalfa sprouts for another meal.

I do not believe this would be conducive to optimal nutrition, nor do I believe that all types of Hygienic foods lend themselves optimally to this usage. For example, romaine lettuce and nuts or seeds combine well; this combination has been observed to produce more efficient digestion of both foods.

Several days on a mono diet, followed by several more days on monotrophic meals, immediately following a prolonged fast—or, perhaps, during a flareup of digestive problems—may prove to be very beneficial. But people who implement diets consisting of all mono meals usually concentrate on fruit and neglect nuts and green leaves. This can be damaging, even disastrous. Such a practice may ultimately result in protein deficiencies and other serious pathological problems.

Dr. Herbert M. Shelton says (The Hygienic System, Volume II, Orthotrophy, Page 223): “As there are no pure frugivores, all frugivores eating freely of green leaves and other parts of plants, man may, also, without violating his constitutional nature, partake of green plants. These parts of plants possess certain advantages, in which fruits are deficient. Actual tests have shown that the addition of green vegetables to the fruit and nut diet improves the diet.”

In the June 1976 issue of Dr. Shelton’s Hygienic Review, Dr. Shelton says: “If man is a frugivore, as we have tried to demonstrate, then his natural diet should consist of fruits, nuts and green vegetables. The inclusion of tender, succulent green leaves, stems and flowers should not be considered a violation of his constitutional nature, as practically all animals in nature consume green foliage of one kind or another.

For example, the frugivora consume large amounts of wild celery and other leafy plants along with their fruits and nuts. At times, even the carnivora consume large amounts of vegetation. Green leafy plants may be regarded as a wild card throughout nature. Whatever else an animal eats, whatever else it is specifically adapted for, some green leafy food is invariably included in the diet.

“Besides being specifically adapted to his digestive mechanism, fruits are also appealing to man’s visual, olfactory and gustatory senses. They require no cooking, no dressing, no seasoning, no utensils, and hardly any cultivation, considering the abundance of wild fruit trees. Could any other food be more natural for us? With the addition of nuts and green vegetables, the fruitarian diet is as nutritionally sound as it is biologically correct.”

Green leafy vegetables are more abundant in alkaline minerals than fruits. They are an excellent source of calcium, iron and other valuable minerals. They are rich in vitamins and contain small amounts of protein of the highest quality and biological value. They are the richest source of chlorophyll, such as only green plants can provide.

The analysis of chlorophyll shows it to be almost identical with the blood hemoglobin, except that the blood contains iron and chlorophyll contains magnesium. Increasing the amount of green leafy vegetables in the diet has been known to aid the body to correct secondary anemia.

The scientist, Frans Miller, wrote, “Chlorophyll has the same fast blood-building effect as iron in animals made anemic.” The regenerative effect of crude chlorophyll from green leaves (not pure chlorophyll) was demonstrated through numerous scientific experiments in this country and abroad. (See Viktoras Kulvinskas article on chlorophyll.)

Green leaves convert sunlight into food by a process called photosynthesis, aided by the green pigment chlorophyll. Photosynthesis is the production of carbohydrate, in the presence of carbon dioxide, water and light. Since only green plants can do this, they are the most important things on our planet,, because they make possible the continuity of life.

Dr. Virginia V. Vetrano says (Dr. Shelton’s Hygienic Review, January 1975, Page 116): “The Hygienic doctor has always advocated that some vegetables, particularly leafy vegetables, be eaten along with the fruit and nut diet, mainly because of the protein content in leafy vegetables. Most individuals have a difficult time adjusting to eating only nuts for protein and take an insufficient amount of protein at first; proteins of high biologic value are easily supplied by adding green vegetables to the diet.”

Dr. Vetrano has also repeatedly advocated the regular use of nuts in the diet—in fact, they were served at the Health School every day. She is convinced that this source of concentrated protein is a necessary part of the daily diet. She says that whole nuts should be used, but that freshly-made nut butter or ground nuts can and should be used, if an individual does not have good teeth. (Dr. Shelton’s Hygienic Review, February 1976, Page 135).

Dr. Shelton had many young people come to him during the time that Arnold Ehret’s dietary system (The Mucusless Diet) was in the heyday of its popularity. These young people had been on his low or no (concentrated) protein diet for several years or longer and were suffering from weakness, ease of fatigue, and transverse and longitudinal ridges in their fingernails. After studying their problems for a while, he came to the conclusion that the problem was nothing more than a protein deficiency. He fasted them for three days, added protein to their diets, and they all recovered. (Dr. Vetrano, Dr. Shelton’s Hygienic Review, October 1974).

I myself have repeatedly encountered individuals who, for as long as six months to a year after a fast, were becoming weaker and more enervated with each passing day—even having fainting spells. In every case, they had been convinced that concentrated proteins (nuts and seeds) were unnecessary, even inadvisable. When they added nuts and seeds to their diets, spontaneous and continuous improvement followed in every case.

Dr. Burton says (See his article “The Hygienic Diet” in Lesson 22): “I personally view the diet containing a large proportion of fresh fruits and vegetables, accompanied by three to four ounces of concentrated protein (nuts and seeds) as being the most satisfactory.” He says we should attempt to secure our nutrients from a wide variety of foods, though, obviously, not at the same meal.

True that protein deprivation has to be prolonged and extreme in order to produce obvious signs of its inadequacy. Dr. Burton also makes the point that the varying needs and capacities of individuals must dominate in establishing requirements.

Eat a variety of Hygienic foods. Overeating of citrus and other fruits may be more easily avoided if it is thoroughly understood that a meal program which includes a variety of Hygienic foods, including fruits, nuts and seeds, green leafy vegetables, and sprouted seeds, is the best road to optimal nutrition.

It is not difficult to fall into the trap of the overeating of fruits. They are the most delightful of foods. They are also among the finest and best of foods, if properly used.

In many respects, I empathize and even tend to agree with those who maintain that the delights and nutritional value of fruits are unsurpassed. If, in addition, nuts, seeds and sprouts, and chlorophyll-rich green leaves are not neglected, optimal nutrition would be assured.

Dr. Esser really brings it all together with this sage observation: “Fruits and nuts are the perfect foods for man, but in the civilized areas of the world it is virtually an impossibility to obtain a sufficiently rounded supply for perfect nutrition and health. Therefore it is necessary to supplement them with vegetables. It will be found that vegetables are delicious and succulent.”

I know it was a great relief to me, after my 29-day fast, when I was (after almost two weeks on fruit juices and fruits) at last given something to eat that was not sweet. When I was permitted to have at least one salad meal every day, with nuts or avocado or coconut or raw sweet corn, my improvement, weight gain and energy multiplied.

Recap: Monotrophic fruit meals are excellent; a total, diet of monotrophic meals is not advisable. Since the usual monotrophic meal consists of one kind of fruit or melon, it would seem that at least one meal daily (or, at the very least, one meal every second day) should consist of several salad vegetables and a protein (or possibly a starch).

But keep it simple! The less complex our food mixtures, and the simpler our meals, the more efficient will be our digestion, ‘and the better our health. Few foods at a meal, with sufficient variety of different types of foods over the period of several meals to insure that the body gets all the nutrients it needs, is the ideal Hygienic food program.

Relationship of the diet to the acid-alkaline balance of the body: In general, the diet should consist of at least 75% alkaline-reacting foods and 25% or less of acid-forming foods. Most foods with high protein content are acid-forming. Adherence to a varied Hygienic diet, and to the other principles of Natural Hygiene (especially regular, vigorous exercise) will enable your body to adequately monitor its own acid-alkaline balance, since there is a buffer action in the organism which serves to maintain an equilibrium between alkalinity and acidity. Minerals play an important part in the regulation of this function.

Animal proteins, which contain sulfur, uric acid and other acid end-products, tend to leach the tissues of their alkaline salts. These alkaline salts (minerals) are particularly needed by the cells to buffer and render such end-products less acid, and thus less irritating to the cells and tissues.

The alkaline properties of vegetable and nut proteins help to maintain the acid-alkaline balance of the body. Thus, correct eating (and exercise) are the keys in maintaining the acid-alkaline balance. Eating vegetables helps to maintain your acid-alkaline balance. If only fruits are eaten, the balance tends to swing to the alkaline side eating only proteins swings it to the acid side. Bananas are neutral if you are in good health, but otherwise they are slightly alkaline.

Monotrophic Diets as “Elimination Diets”

“Elimination diets,” which can be mono-diets, are often referred to under the misnomers “juice fasts” or “fruit fasts.” Diets that are not stressful on the body and allow it to better perform its eliminative functions are sometimes useful when urgent symptoms require the temporary cessation of normal food intake, and it is not possible to go to bed and fast.

However, the substitution of a long-term juice or fruit diet, when a fast is indicated, may be unwise and wasteful of the body’s energy, because this does not accomplish the striking long-term benefits of the fast with nothing but distilled water. Nevertheless, a temporary juice diet or fruit diet may be indicated in some cases.

If serious problems exist, a professional Hygienist can help to make this choice or decision. There are other types of “elimination diets” (some not monotrophic) that are sometimes prescribed where a fast
must be postponed, or should not be undertaken at the particular time.

“Elimination diets” are low in proteins, carbohydrates and fats. This causes the cells to use stored reserves to meet their requirements. During such a diet, the body can eliminate toxic matters and accumulated wastes, but never as efficiently or thoroughly as it would during a fast. The fast is always more efficacious in eliminating toxic wastes than is any kind of elimination diet. Greater benefit can be expected from one week of a complete fast than from two or three weeks of an elimination diet.

Further, a mono diet (the use of one food only—such as citrus, grapes or watermelon) may result in the production of imbalances in the body. During a total fast, the body is better able to monitor its own nutrition in a more balanced manner from the use of nutriments stored in the body.

A total fast increases metabolic efficiency. For example, the process of energy release from glucose (stored as glycogen in the liver) which is at 25% efficiency when eating, is increased to 45°/o efficiency when fasting (according to Dr. Alec Burton).

On a monotrophic diet, there is often a tendency to feel hungry and unsatisfied, while, during a total fast, hunger pangs usually disappear. As you can see, the uses of monotrophic diets are limited. (See Dr. Vetrano’s article “Mono-Eliminating Diets”.)

Application Of The Food Combining Rules

You will note that the discussion of a particular food combining rule will frequently overlap and dovetail with other food combining rules, since they are all closely interrelated.

Since starch digestion begins in the mouth with the action there of the enzyme ptyalin and requires an alkaline or neutral medium—while protein digestion begins in the stomach, where acid enzymes are secreted when protein is eaten—the first two and most important food combining rules seem obvious.

Carbohydrates with Acids or Proteins

  1. Never eat carbohydrate foods and acid foods at the same meal.
  2. Never eat a concentrated protein and a concentrated carbohydrate at the same meal.

Carbohydrates include starches, sugars and cellulose. Lesson 22 demonstrated in great detail how incompatible combinations such as protein with carbohydrates reduce and inhibit the efficiency of digestive enzymes and subject the foods to decomposition in the digestive tract.

Some illustrations of combinations at the same meal which can produce this abortive effect are:

  • Potatoes or other starchy vegetables with tomatoes or other fruit
  • Starchy vegetables with nuts or other concentrated proteins
  • Grains or legumes with tomatoes or other fruit
  • Grains or legumes with nuts or other concentrated proteins

This means that when people eat meat and potatoes together, or a meat sandwich, they are not only consuming foods that cause problems when eaten separately (meat, bread), they are also compounding the problem by ingesting them at the same meal with foods that require different conditions for digestion.

Tomatoes (acid fruit without the sugar content of other acid fruits) may be used with the vegetable salad or with any green or nonstarchy vegetable. They may also be eaten with protein/fat foods like nuts, cheese and avocados.

This seems to contradict Food Combining Rule No. 6, prohibiting the acid-protein combination. However, in actual practice, most Hygienists do use tomatoes with nuts and avocados rather freely. Both Dr. Shelton and Dr. Vetrano have come to consider these combinations acceptable and even desirable.

But Food Combining Rules Nos. 1 and 2 are extremely important, and there is general agreement among Hygienic professional and lay people that acids should not be used with starches nor with foods which combine concentrated starches with concentrated proteins (grains, legumes).

Since soy beans are higher in protein and fat, but lower in carbohydrates than other beans, there might be some possibility of combining them with tomatoes. I have experimented with this combination and have rejected it for my own use.

Any meal which includes cooked starches, or any cooked food, should begin with a large green salad. If you do use cooked foods, you should always use some raw food at the same meal, preferably as the first course.

Foods in the slightly starchy category, such as carrots, are best used with starchy vegetables like potatoes. When eating starch/protein foods, such as rice or beans, it is best to use green or nonstarchy vegetables only. Green and nonstarchy vegetables contain very small amounts of proteins and carbohydrates, and thus will not  further complicate the digestion of the combination foods.

Some Examples of Percentages of Protein and Carbohydrate Content Of Various Categories of  Foods

Protein Content
Carbohydrate Content
Concentrated Protein Foods:
Almonds
18.6%
19.5%
Sunflower Seeds
24%
19.9%
Cashews
17.2%
29.3%
Starch/Protein Foods
Brown Rice
7.5%
77.4%
Wild Rice
14.1%
75.3%
Fresh Coconut Meat
3.5%
9.4%
Starchy Vegetables
Yam
2.1%
23.2%
Potato
2.1%
17.1%
Mildly Starchy Vegetables
Winter Squash
1.4%
12.4%
Carrot
1.1%
9.7%
Nonstarchy Vegetables
Cauliflower
2.7%
5.2%
Summer Squash
1.1%
4.2%
Romaine Lettuce
1.3%
3.5%
Sweet Fruits
Banana
1.1%
22.2%
Dried Date
2.2%
72.9%
Subacid Fruits
Apple
.2%
14.1%
Peach
.6%
9.7%
Acid Fruits
Orange
1.0%
12.2%
Pineapple
.3%
13.7%

Composition and Facts About Foods, by Ford Heritage, lists the protein and carbohydrate content of most common foods. You need not become an expert on these fine points, unless that is your desire. The food classification and food combining charts in this lesson will be adequate to help you to become enough of an expert in the food combining system to enable you to plan properly combined meals, and to teach others to do the same.

Examples of Menus That Do Not Violate Food Combining Rules No. 1 and 2

  1. No Carbohydrate with Acid
  2. No Carbohydrate with Protein
Carbohydrate Menus (No Acid or Protein)
Protein Menus (No Carbohydrates)
 
 
Bibb lettuce

Celery

Cucumber

Sweet potatoes (raw or cooked)

Water chestnuts

Romaine lettuce

Celery

Tomatoes

Raw broccoli

Pecans

 
 
Romaine lettuce

Sweet pepper

Edible pod peas

Sweet corn (raw or steamed)

Boston lettuce

Sweet red pepper

Tomatoes

Kale (raw or steamed)

Sprouted sunflower seeds

 
 
Boston lettuce

Raw carrots

Brussels sprouts (raw or steamed)

Potatoes (steamed or baked)

Young, sweet cabbage

Cucumber

Alfalfa sprouts

Tomatoes

Cashews

 
 
Celery or cabbage

Raw turnips

Green beans (raw or steamed)

Raw yellow squash

Cooked rice

Ruby leaf lettuce

Celery

Raw zucchini squash

Soy bean sprouts

Examples of Menus That Violate Food Combining Rules No. 1 and 2

  1. No Carbohydrate with Acid
  2. No Carbohydrate with Protein
Boston lettuce

Sweet pepper

*Tomatoes

*Sweet potatoes

NO-NO! (Acid with starch)
 
 
Bibb lettuce

Celery

*Peaches

*Sweet corn

*Almonds

NO-NO! (Starch with protein, fruit with starch, fruit with protein)
 
 
Romaine lettuce

Celery

Broccoli

*Oranges

*Jerusalem artichoke

NO-NO! (Acid fruit with starch)
 
 
Cabbage

Cucumber

*Tomatoes

*Lentil sprouts

*Rice

NO-NO! (Two combination starch/protein foods; acid with combination foods)
 
 
Leaf lettuce

Celery

*Dates

*Pecans

NO-NO! (Sweet fruit with Protein)
 
 
Cabbage

Celery

Alfalfa sprouts

*Potatoes

*Sunflower seeds

NO-NO! (Starch with protein)
 
 
Bibb lettuce

Cucumber

Sweet pepper

*Millet

*Cashews

NO-NO! (Protein with combination starch/protein food)
 
 
Ruby leaf lettuce

Cabbage

Yellow squash

*Acorn squash

*Soy beans

NO-NO! (Starch with combination protein/starch food)

Protein-Protein Combinations

  1. Never consume two concentrated proteins at the same meal.

Gastric acidity, and type, timing and strength of secretions for various proteins are not uniform. Therefore, do not combine nuts with cheese, nor any of the following concentrated protein foods with each other: nuts, avocado, soy beans, cheese, eggs, flesh foods. Alfalfa sprouts, which are considered a green vegetable, may be used with a concentrated protein.

vegetable

For optimal digestive efficiency, only one variety of nuts or seeds should be used at a sitting, but, if digestive problems are not a factor, it may be possible to eat two or three varieties together without harm. Some personal experimentation in this area is indicated.

You may desire to combine one variety of seeds with one variety of nuts, or not to use high-fat nuts like brazils or macadamias by themselves. I have had good results in combining such high-fat nuts with lower-fat nuts or seeds. It might also be useful to combine expensive nuts like macadamias or pignolias with lower-priced nuts or seeds, in order to be able to afford the indulgence and variety of including the higher-priced nuts in the diet.

Some high-fat nuts are:

Macadamias
71.6% Fat
Brazils
66.9% Fat
Pecans
71.2% Fat

Some lower-fat nuts and seeds are:

Almonds
54.2% Fat
Pignolias
47.4% Fat
Sunflower seeds
47.3% Fat
Pumpkin seeds
45.8% Fat
Sesame seeds
52.2% Fat

Do not combine cashews with other nuts; the cashew is a part of the cashew apple and is not a true nut. It has a higher carbohydrate content than true nuts, having 29.3% carbohydrate and 17.2% protein. By contrast, for example, the almond has 19.5% carbohydrate and 18.6% protein.

Actually, the cashew is the pistil of the cashew apple. The whole raw cashew has within its shell a thick caustic liquid. In preparing cashews for marketing, they are “parched” to dissipate the acid, and then shelled. While not exactly “raw”, they have not been subjected to the “roasting” (deep-frying) given “roasted nuts”, and are considered good Hygienic food. They are combined in the same manner as nuts and can be eaten with a salad.

Peanuts, of course, are not nuts. They are combination starch/protein foods, and are combined as starch.

If you experience any problems in learning to eat and digest nuts, it would be best to use only one variety at a sitting. Start out with small quantities, one to two ounces, and use only with salads. If you do have problems with nuts, experiment and find those you handle best and use mostly those. You will eventually build, up your nut-digesting ability and be able to use more varieties.

Most people have no problem with sunflower seeds. Those who do can begin by using them slightly sprouted. Just soak overnight, drain and let them progress until just a small sprout is showing. Complete sprouting instructions will be given in Lesson 26, Preparing and Serving Foods.

Although the pecan is a high-fat nut, it is easy to chew and seems to agree with most people. Cashews are also easy to chew and most people enjoy the sweet taste.

Almonds are valuable nuts, and have a somewhat alkaline reaction, whereas other nuts have the acid reaction commonly found in protein foods. However, they are hard and more difficult to masticate thoroughly. Problems may be avoided by thoroughly masticating and insalivating these nuts.

It does not seem necessary to give examples of menus which do or do not violate Food Combining Rule No. 3. It should suffice to repeat: eat but one protein food at a meal, and do not combine nuts, avocados, soy beans, cheese, eggs or flesh foods with each other.

Protein-Fat Combinations

  1. Do not consume fats with proteins.

For the conventional eater, this means do not use cream, butter or oil with meat (any flesh foods), eggs, cheese or nuts. For the budding or experienced Hygienist, the fat foods are avocados and nuts. Of course, nuts are also a principal protein food. Avocados also contain small amounts of excellent protein. Since the Hygienic “fat” foods are really protein/fat foods, it would certainly be inadvisable to add more fat to the meal.

You learned in Lesson 22 that fat has an inhibiting influence on digestion. We have also emphasized that we do not use two proteins at the same meal. So, it is obvious you would not use nuts and avocados at the same meal. This would also apply to cheese, if you use it—do not use cheese with avocados or nuts.

However, in implementing the “no protein-fat combination” rule, it must also be borne in mind that you should not use cream, butter or oils with protein foods, whether they are protein/fat foods (which most of them are) or whether they are among the few low-fat protein foods (legumes, skim milk cheese, lean meat).

Menus That Do Not Violate Food Combining Rule No. 4 No Fat with Protein

Boston lettuce

Celery cabbage

Cucumber

Pecans

Sweet, young cabbage

Cucumber

Sweet pepper

Alfalfa sprouts

Cheese

 
 
Romaine lettuce

Cucumber

Celery

Tomato

Avocado

Kale

Cucumber

Celery

Soy pecan sprouts

Menus That Violate Food Combining Rule No. 4

Cabbage

Tomato

Celery

*Avocado

*Pecans

NO-NO! (A fat/protein with a protein/fat)
 
 
Boston lettuce

Celery cabbage

Tomato

*Cheese

*Walnuts

NO-NO! (Two protein/fat foods)
 
 
Leaf lettuce

Kale

Cucumber

Celery

*Cooked soy beans with butter added

NO-NO! (Fat added to high protein combination food)
 
 
Romaine lettuce

Sweet pepper

Broccoli

*Cheese

*Avocado

NO-NO!(A protein/fat food with a fat/protein)

Fats in Combination with Other Foods

  1. Use fats sparingly.

Too much fat taken with a meal results in discomfort and digestive problems. The best way to use fats, in moderation, is with raw green vegetables. If fats are used with other foods, adding raw green leafy vegetables to the meal will help to counteract the inhibiting effect of fats on gastric secretion.

In Lesson 22, it was pointed out that the use of avocados (low protein/fat) with starch is considered fair, provided a green salad is included with the meal. Nuts (high protein/fat) are not used with starch. The best way to use avocados or nuts is with the salad meal.

We also concluded that, while the use of avocados with subacid or acid fruit is ordinarily considered only a fair combination, it has been found that including salad vegetables, especially lettuce and celery, in the avocado/fruit meal enhances its digestion, and it becomes a quite acceptable combination.

Menus, That Do Not Violate Food Combining Rule No. 5 Fats with Other Foods

Bibb lettuce

Celery cabbage

Cucumber

Tomato

Avocado

Leaf lettuce

Celery

Cucumber

Potato (steamed or baked)

Avocado

 
 
Romaine lettuce

Celery

Sweet pepper

Alfalfa sprouts

Avocado

Peaches

Apples

Lettuce

Celery

Avocado

In the above menus we are using avocado only as an example of the correct combining of fat. We are not using nuts (high protein/fat) as examples of fat with other foods, because when we combine nuts with other foods, their protein content is our primary concern. As for other fats (butter, oil, etc.), they do not really belong in a list of Hygienically correct menus.

Menus That Violate Food Combining Rule No. 5 Fats with Other Foods

Cucumber

Green beans

*Steamed potato with butter

*Avocado

NO-NO! (Two foods high in fat)
 
 
Bananas

*Dates

*Avocado

NO-NO! (A fat/protein with dried sweet fruit—this would be somewhat better if lettuce and/or celery were included.)
 
 
Carrots

Buttered cooked sweet corn

Avocado

NO-NO! (Two foods high in fat)
 
 
Salad with oil dressing

Rice

Avocado

NO-NO! (Two foods high in fat)

Acid-Protein Combinations

  1. Do not eat acid fruits with proteins.

There is some variation in practice as to the use of citrus or other acid fruit with nuts. Dr. Vetrano has discontinued this practice, but it is still used by other Hygienic professionals and lay people. Those with digestive problems should certainly avoid this combination. The student should carefully re-read the text of Food Combining Rule No. 6 (in Lesson 22) for an understanding of this subject.

Those with unimpaired digestions can probably decide on an individual basis whether they should experiment with this combination. The choices would be (a) no citrus with nuts, (b) eat citrus, wait one-half hour to one hour before eating the nuts, and (c) eat the citrus and nuts together. The best practice is (a), because it is not good Hygienic practice to eat a meal in “relays.”

If you do use citrus and nuts at the same meal, it would be a good idea to include some lettuce and/or celery.

The same reasoning would also apply to other acid fruits, such as pineapple, strawberries, tart apples, etc. The less sugar they contain, the less objection there is to combining them with nuts.

The same reasoning would apply to the use of citrus or other acid fruits with other protein foods, such as avocado or cheese.

People who use eggs or flesh foods should avoid the use of any fruit at the same meal. The use of these foods causes enough problems without also adding the extra problems of combining the fruit acids and sugars with the flesh foods.

Sour salad dressings and acid fruit drinks are bad with any meal, but are particularly bad with protein meals because they check hydrochloric acid secretion.

Menus Illustrating Food Combining Rule No. 6 Acid Fruits with Proteins

Good Combinations

Lettuce

Celery

Tomato

Brazil  nuts  (or other nuts, or avocado, or cheese, if you use it)

Fair Combinations

Lettuce

Kiwi fruit

Almonds

Lettuce

Grapefruit

Avocado

Somewhat tart oranges, pineapple, strawberries or apples, combined with nuts, avocado or cheese would also be fair combinations.

Bad Combinations

Very sweet oranges, pineapple, strawberries or other fruit, combined with nuts, avocado or cheese would be bad combinations (too much sugar with protein).

Sugar with Starch, Protein, Acid Fruit

  1. Do not combine sweet fruits with foods that require a long digestion time—such as proteins, starches and acid fruit.

Sugar with protein, starch or acid leads to fermentation, a sour stomach and discomfort. When protein or starch foods are combined with sugars, they may remain in the stomach almost twice as long as is normal. Use sweet fruits only as indicated in Food Combining Rule No. 10.

The same principle applies to the use of any sugar, honey, molasses or syrup, which are especially prone to ferment if used with mixed meals. Of course, these types of sugars should not be used at all—with anything. Refined sugar robs the body of B-vitamins and throws a “monkey-wrench” into the digestive machinery. The other “sweeteners” are almost as bad. A future lesson will discuss in detail the harmfulness of sweeteners.

Menus That Do Not Violate Food Combining Rule No. 7

Sweet Fruits with Foods Requiring a Long Digestion Time

Lettuce

Grapes

Bananas

Lettuce

Sweet mangos

Persimmons

 
 
Celery

Cherries

Delicious apples

Dates

Celery

Lettuce

Pears

Peaches

Raisins

Menus That Violate Food Combining Rule No. 7

Sweet Fruits with Foods Requiring a Long Digestion Time

Jonathan apples

Strawberries

Bananas

NO-NO! (Acid fruit with sweet fruit)

 
 
Plums

Oranges

Dates

NO-NO! (Acid fruit with sweet dried fruit)
 
 
Sweet corn

Persimmons

Figs

NO-NO! (Starch with sweet fruit)
 
 
Apples

Raisins

Pecans

NO-NO! (Protein with sweet fruit)  (Many people have said they like to eat this combination,

but it should be avoided, as it is quite incompatible.)

Starch-Starch Combinations

  1. Eat but one concentrated starch at a meal.

This rule may be important principally as a means of avoiding overeating of starches, but it is a good rule to follow. Never combine a concentrated starch with a combination food (starch/protein food) such as grains or legumes. Never combine two combination foods at the same meal (such as rice with beans).

Slightly starchy foods may be combined with concentrated starches but not with combination foods. Potatoes with carrots, green beans and a large green salad is a good combination (if you are using cooked food). Brown rice would be better combined with broccoli, yellow squash and a salad.

Two mildly starchy vegetables may be combined if no concentrated starch is used, e.g., globe artichokes and carrots, or beets and edible pod peas.

Menus That Do Not Violate Food Combining Rule No. 8 One Concentrated Starch at a Meal

Ruby lettuce

Carrots

Celery

Raw Broccoli

Globe artichoke

Celery cabbage

Cucumber

Edible pod peas

Sweet corn (raw or cooked)

 
 
Cabbage

Sweet pepper

Cucumber

Green beans (raw or cooked)

Potatoes

Bibb lettuce

Celery

Cauliflower (raw or cooked)

Yams (raw or cooked)

 
 
Romaine lettuce

Celery

Sweet pepper

Cauliflower (raw or cooked)

Butternut squash

Boston lettuce

Cucumber

Water chestnuts

Parsnips

Menus That Violate Food Combining Rule Nr. 8 One Concentrated Starch at a Meal

Bibb lettuce

Sweet pepper

Kale

*Sweet corn

*Potatoes

NO-NO! (Too much starch—unless corn is young, green and freshly picked)
 
 
Celery cabbage

Cucumber

*Cauliflower

*Acorn squash

* Jerusalem artichokes

NO-NO! (Too much starch)
 
 
Leaf lettuce

Celery

Broccoli

*Sweet potatoes

*Rice

NO-NO! (Starch with combination starch/protein food)
 
 
Cabbage

Celery

Cucumber

Zucchini squash1

*Potatoes

*Chestnuts

NO-NO! (Starch with combination starch/protein food)

Acid Fruits, Subacid Fruits, Sweet Fruits

  1. Acid fruits may be used with the less sweet subacid fruits.

Tomatoes should not be used with subacid fruits. The acid fruits are those with the tart flavors (see Food Classification Chart in this lesson). The less sweet subacid fruits are some grapes (those which are neither sweet nor sour), some varieties of apples, most mangos, and any fruit on the subacid list which is not really sweet.

Menus Illustrating Food Combining Rule No. 9

Good Combinations

Lettuce

Oranges

Apples

Celery

Pineapple

Peaches (if not sweet)

Lettuce

Strawberries

Plums (if not sweet)

Bad Combinations

Tomatoes

Bananas

NO-NO! Acid with sweet fruit
 
 
Grapefruit

Sweet cherries

NO-NO! Acid with sweet fruit
 
 
Oranges

Delicious apples

NO-NO! Acid with sweet fruit

Acid Fruits, Subacid Fruits, Sweet Fruits

  1. The sweeter subacid fruits may be used with sweet fruits.
fruit

The sweeter subacid fruits are any fruits on the subacid list that have a marked sweet taste. See Food Classification Chart for a list of the sweet fruits. Dried sweet fruits should be used sparingly—one kind at a meal—and in small quantities.

Menus Illustrating Food Combining Rule No. 10

Good Combinations

Lettuce

Delicious apples

Bananas

Lettuce

Pears

Persimmons

 
 
Celery

Sweet grapes

Dates

Celery

Papayas

Figs

Bad Combinations

Tart apples

Bananas

NO-NO! (Acid with sweet fruit)
 
 
Tart mangos

Dates

NO-NO! (Acid with sweet fruit)
 
 
Tart grapes

Persimmons

NO-NO! (Acid with sweet fruit)
 
 
Tart peaches

Figs

NO-NO! (Acid with sweet fruit)

Fruits with Vegetables

  1. Do not combine fruit with any vegetables other than lettuce and/or celery.

Lettuce and celery combine well with all types of fruit except melon. It is best to use two to four varieties of fruit at a fruit meal, plus lettuce and/or celery. These green leafy vegetables may even enhance digestion of the fruit.

Menus Illustrating Food Combining Rule No. 11

Good Combinations

Lettuce

Celery

Sweet grapes

Pears

Bananas

Lettuce

Sweet apples

Sweet cherries

Fresh figs

Celery

Papayas

Sweet peaches

Persimmons

Bad Combinations

Broccoli

Yellow squash

Apples

Dates

NO-NO! (Fruits with vegetables other than lettuce and celery)
 
 
Lettuce

Pears

Sweet corn

Bananas

NO-NO! (Fruits with vegetables other than lettuce and celery)
 
 
Lettuce

Blueberries

Green beans

Potatoes

NO-NO! (Fruits with vegetables other than lettuce and celery)

Fruits with Vegetables

1. Salads combine very well with either proteins or starches.

salad

Green leafy vegetables combine well with most other foods. They are excellent food and should be used in abundance. Do not combine any vegetables with melon.

A large daily salad is an excellent part of your food program. The dark green leafy vegetables are the best for salad—Romaine, Boston, leaf or Bibb lettuce, green celery—to which may be added cucumbers, sweet peppers, raw broccoli, raw turnips or raw cauliflower. Raw carrots may be added if u is a starch meal; tomatoes may be added if no starch or combination foods are included in the meal.

Menus Illustrating Food Combining Rule No. 12

Good Combinations

Lettuce

Celery cabbage

Cucumber

Tomatoes

Nuts

Lettuce

Celery

Sweet pepper

Raw broccoli

Avocado

Lettuce and/or celery with any fruit

Bad Combinations

Lettuce

Celery

Watermelon

NO-NO! (Do not combine salad vegetables with melon)
 
 
Tomatoes

Celery cabbage

Honeydew melon

NO-NO! (Do not combine salad vegetables with melon)

Melons

  1. Do not consume melons with other foods.

They do not combine well with any food, except, perhaps, with certain fruits. Those with unimpaired digestions may wish to experiment with the use of grapes or other subacid fruits with melon. It is really best to take melon alone, especially watermelon. Melon decomposes much more quickly than other fruits and, if held up in the stomach awaiting the digestion of other foods, will decompose and cause gastric distress.

Never eat watermelon with nuts. There are a number of different kinds of melon, and it is better to eat your fill of one kind as one meal.

I am not giving any examples of melon with subacid fruits. 1 do not really recommend using melon with any other foods, since 1 believe this is a good rule for most people. Those who wish to experiment with the use of melons with subacid fruits should do so very carefully, testing one subacid fruit (in small amounts) at a time. (See Dr. Vetrano’s comments on this subject.)

Sprouts

  1. Alfalfa sprouts may be combined as a green vegetable.

Other sprouts should be classified somewhat in the same category as the original seed, even though the protein and carbohydrates are less concentrated. (Review the discussion of sprouts in Lesson 22.)

Classification of Sprouts for Purpose of Food Combining

Alfalfa seeds, sprouted
Green vegetable
Mung beans, sprouted
Green vegetable protein/starch (combine as starch)
Grains, sprouted, sprouted
Mildly starchy combination foods
Sunflower seeds
Protein
Soy beans, sprouted
Protein
Lentils, sprouted
Protein

Menus Illustrating Food Combining Rule No. 14

Good Combinations

Tomato

Lettuce

Alfalfa sprouts

Nuts

Celery

Cucumber

Avocado

Mung bean sprouts

 
 
Cabbage

Sweet pepper

Broccoli

Sprouted soy beans

Lettuce

Celery

Cauliflower

Green beans

Sprouted wheat

Bad Combinations

Lettuce

Cucumber

Sprouted mung beans*

Nuts*

NO-NO! (Protein with combination food)
 
 
Celery

Sweet Pepper

Sprouted rye*

Nuts*

NO-NO! (Protein with combination food)
 
 
Cabbage

Celery

Sprouted sunflower seeds*

Potatoes*

NO-NO! (Protein with starch)
 
 
Lettuce

Tomatoes*

Lentils, sprouted*

Rice*

NO-NO! (Acid and protein with combination food)

Milk, Clabber and Yogurt

(Not Recommended)

  1. Milk is best taken alone.
milk

This rule is included because it is one of Dr. Shelton’s food combining rules, and because this lesson may be helpful to those still on a mixed diet. Please review the text in Lesson 22 on Food Combining Rule No. 15. I hope you will decide not to use milk, clabber or yogurt.

I am not including menus for the best ways to combine these foods, but will simply say they are best used alone, but are a fair combination with acid or subacid fruit.

Good, Fair, Poor and Bad Combinations

  • Good combinations are good for the weakest digestion.
  • Fair combinations are permissible for those with unimpaired digestions.
  • Poor combinations should only be used by people with the best digestions, and then rarely (or they may lose their distinction of possessing the “best” digestions).
  • Bad combinations are so bad that no one should ever use them.

Examples

Good combinations

Golden Delicious apples

Thompson seedless grapes

Lettuce and celery

Bananas

Lettuce

Cucumber

Sweet peppers

Alfalfa sprouts

Nuts

Fair Combinations

Jonathan apples

Pears

Lettuce

Avocado

(Avocado with fruit)

Lettuce

Cabbage

Green beans

Potatoes

Avocado

(Avocado with starch)

Poor Combinations

Cherries

Lettuce

Avocado

Soaked dried apricots

(Avocado with dried sweet fruit—the fact that it has been soaked and that lettuce is included with the meal improves it somewhat.)

Celery cabbage

Cucumber

Mung bean sprouts

Nuts

(It would be better to use alfalfa sprouts with nuts.)

Bad Combinations

Grapes

Avocado

Bananas

Dates

(Concentrated fat with too much concentrated sugar.)

Lettuce

Celery

Cabbage

Rice

Potatoes

(Starch with combination starch/protein food)

Discrepancies

You may detect discrepancies if you compare the different food charts and classifications of foods as interpreted by various authors and professionals. For instance, you may see butternut or acorn squash listed by one author as starchy, and mildly starchy by another author.

If you are really concerned about it, you can refer to Composition and Facts About Foods, by Ford Heritage, or Composition of Foods, Department of Agriculture Handbook No. 8. You can then make your own decision.

Sweet potatoes with 26.3% carbohydrates, yams with 23.2% carbohydrates and potatoes with 17.1% carbohydrates are all considered starchy foods. Carrots with 9.7% carbohydrates and beets with 9.9% carbohydrates are considered mildly starchy. Winter squash (butternut, acorn, etc.) has 12.5% carbohydrates. Would you classify it with the 17.1% potatoes or the 9.9% beets? It’s not too important, since starches may be used together, if desired, provided the total quantity of starch at the meal does not exceed, say, 15% of the meal.

Cauliflower, with only 5.2% carbohydrates, is listed by some as mildly starchy, yet its carbohydrate content is less than that of broccoli or brussels sprouts.

Another case in point is the coconut. Dr. Esser classified it as protein, but Dr. Shelton combines it as starch. It is actually a combination food, and is usually combined as a starch. But when we look it up in the food charts, we find that fresh coconut contains 9.4% carbohydrate and 3.5% protein; dried coconut contains 23% carbohydrate and 7.2% protein.

By comparison, almonds contain 19.5% carbohydrate and 18.6% protein; pecans 14.6% carbohydrate and 9.2% protein; these, of course, are classified as protein foods.

Brown rice contains 77.4% carbohydrate, 9.6% protein; fresh lima beans contain 22.1% carbohydrate and 8.4% protein; these are combination foods, and are combined as starch.

It seems to me that the coconut, with three times as much starch as protein, should be combined as starch. But, since fresh coconut only has 9.4% carbohydrate, perhaps the idea that its starch content is unimportant is a valid one. What do you think? My own method is to think of it as a combination food, and I don’t use tomatoes or other acid fruits with coconut—it seems the safest interpretation.

If you see other such discrepancies, you may either disregard them and use the food either way, or, if you are uncomfortable about it, get a reference book and look it up. It can be a great satisfaction to resolve such discrepancies in your own mind by tracking down the correct information.

You may also occasionally come across an error in food combining charts; for example, on page 321 of The Hygienic System, Volume II, in one place starch is said to be a bad combination with subacid fruit and in another place on the chart, it is said to be a fair combination. I would say that the use of any fruit with starch would be contraindicated.

The food combining charts in this lesson are as accurate as I could make them, and I hope they will be helpful to you and your students.

Trying Too Hard

Take It Easy!

Don’t try so hard that you become nervous and anxious. Do the best you can. Avoid the worst combinations (dates or bananas with nuts, potatoes or grains with tomatoes, or grain with nuts) and everything else will gradually fall into place.

Occasional indulgence in incorrect food combinations is no cause for anxiety, even though it is not ideal—a healthy body can cope with occasional exceptions. It is what we do daily, habitually, that will make the difference.

Don’t make food the focal point of your life. Above all, the student should not become overly preoccupied with food. Eat your meal and forget it. Let your friends eat their foods and don’t give them a lecture at the dining table. You may have to parry their questions about your eating habits by explaining that you don’t like to enter into these discussions at mealtime, but will be happy to answer their questions afterwards.

Your Social Life

If you take a moderate attitude, the enjoyment of dining out, entertaining or eating at a friend’s home need not be eliminated from your life. Sometimes, with good planning, little or no compromise will be necessary.

Do your best at home, and partake, somewhat selectively, when with your friends. Even if you decide to “go all the way” in Natural Hygiene for optimal health, and never make exceptions at home, it is not necessary to act superior and critical when in company. You can partake enough not to be too conspicuous without really hurting yourself. Just be alert not to carry your indulgences too far, or to loose sight of your goal. You might even find that your friends respect you and are interested in your desire to cooperate with the needs of your body.

Your Family

As for your family, their participation in proper food and good food combining is up to them. You can make better food available, but don’t try to force them to eat anything or to eat in a particular way. They may gradually want to follow your example, or they may never do so. It’s not all that hard to provide simultaneously for your needs and theirs. It’s certainly worth the effort if it’s going to improve your health.

Looking Forward

As you progress in Natural Hygiene, your understanding and application of Hygienic principles will become increasingly synchronized, and you will find it easier today than yesterday, and easier tomorrow than today!

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Food Classification Charts

Proteins Nuts

Pecans ,Almonds, Brazil nuts, Filberts or hazelnuts, English walnuts, butternuts, heart nuts, Black walnuts, Macadamias, Pistachios, Pignolias (Pine nuts), Indian nuts, Beechnuts, Hickory nuts, Cashews

Other Plant Proteins

Soy beans (fresh, dry or sprouted), Sunflower seed sprouts, Lentil sprouts, Garbanzo sprouts

Low Protein

Avocados (may also be classified as a fat and as a neutral fruit), Olives, Milk (not recommended)

Green Vegetable Proteins** (Combine as Starch)

Peas in the pod, Lima and other beans in the pod, Mature green beans in the pod, Mung bean sprouts*

* Mung beans sprouted to green leaf stage—green vegetable starch/protein

** Classified as starches for purposes of food combining

Seeds

Sunflower seeds, Sesame seeds, Pumpkin and squash seeds

Animal proteins (not recommended)

Cheese (raw milk or unprocessed), Eggs, All flesh foods except fat

Starchy proteins * * (not recommended)

(Combine as starch)

Beans: Peas, Lentils, Peanuts, Chestnuts

All grains:Wild rice, Rice, Buckwheat, Millet, Wheat, Rye, Barley

Sprouts

(contain  significant amounts of protein, especially in early stages), Soy sprouts (Combine as protein)

Lentil sprouts (Combine as protein), Sunflower seed sprouts (Combine as protein), Alfalfa sprouts (may be combined as green vegetable), Mung bean sprouts*, All seed, bean & grain sprouts, Combine seed & bean sprouts as protein —except alfalfa, Combine grain sprouts as mildly starchy * Mung beans sprouted to green leaf stage—green vegetable starch/protein

Starches 

Starchy proteins

(Classified as starches for purposes of food combining)

Peanuts, Chestnuts, Coconuts, Dry beans, Dry peas, Lentils, Peas in the pod, Lima & other beans in the pod, Mature green beans in the pod

All grains and all foods containing grains:, Wild rice, Brown rice, Buckwheat groats, Millet, Oats, Wheat, Rye, Barley

Starchy vegetables

White potatoes, Yams and sweet potatoes, Mature corn, Jerusalem artichokes

Parsnips*, Salsify (Oyster plant)*,Mildly starchy vegetables, Carrots, Globe artichokes, Beets, Rutabaga, Edible pod peas, Winter squash (acorn, butternut, hubbard, banana, etc.)*

Pumpkin* , Water chestnuts, Sprouted grains

* Parsnips (17.5% starch) and salsify (18%) are sometimes listed as mildly starchy or even nonstarchy vegetables, but since they contain as much starch as the potato (17.1%) they should properly be classified as starchy.

Winter squash (12.4%) and pumpkin (6.5%) are shown on some charts as starchy, but their starch content is quite a bit lower than potatoes (17.1%). 1 would consider them mildly starchy (or you could consider winter squash as borderline).

* Cauliflower is sometimes listed as mildly starchy, but with a starch content (5.2%) lower than broccoli (5.9%) and Brussels sprouts (8.3%), it properly belongs in the nonstarchy category.

Nonstarchy and green vegetables

Lettuce, Celery, Cabbage (young, sweet), Celery cabbage, Cucumber, Cauliflower* (see * above), Escarole (if not bitter), Sweet pepper, Broccoli, Rappini (similar to broccoli), Brussels sprouts ,Kale, Collard greens, Dandelion greens, Turnip tops, Mustard greens (if young and mild), Okra, Kohlrabi, Turnips, Eggplant, Green corn (if not mature, and if eaten less than 2 hours after picking), Green beans (young & tender), Zucchini (and all other summer squash), Yellow crookneck squash (and all other summer squash), Chayote, Bok choy, Alfalfa sprouts

Use seldom if at all—

too high in oxalic acid (a calcium antagonist)

Spinach, Swiss chard, Beet tops, Rhubarb

Should not be used—

contain concentrated acids & irritants

Bitter cabbage, Endive, Escarole

Contain mustard oil

Irritant foods (unless very young and sweet)—

should not be used often or in large quantities

Parsley, Watercress, Chives, Scallions, Onions, Leeks, Radishes, Garlic, Mature mustard greens

Fats

Fats delay digestion—may take up to four to six hours. The need for fat is small, and the best sources are whole foods like nuts and avocados.

Recommended fats

Edible (protein/fat foods) seeds, nuts and avocados

These fats are not recommended

Not recommended, though used occasionally by some Hygienists.

Butter, Cream

All oils

(Oils are used occasionally by some Hygienists, but are not recommended. Use unrefined cold-pressed oils, preferably stable oils like olive and sesame oil, less likely to be rancid. Oils are fragmented, concentrated foods, and are best omitted)

oil

Olive oil, Sesame oil, Sunflower seed oil, Corn oil, Peanut oil, Cottonseed oil, Safflower oil

All meat fats (not recommended)

Butter substitutes (not recommended)—oleomargarine and the hard white hydrogenated “vegetable” shortenings commonly used in frying and baking are particularly pernicious substances, which the body is not equipped to handle.

Sweet fruits

Fresh: Bananas, Persimmons, Thompson grapes (seedless), Muscat grapes, All sweet grapes, Fresh figs

Dry: Dates, Figs, Raisins, Prunes, Apricots, Peaches, Apples, Cherries,Bananas Litchi “nuts”, Carob, All dried fruit

Some unusual or tropical fruits not listed— sweet taste is a good indication of its classification.

Subacid fruits

Sweet apples (Delicious) Sweet peaches, Sweet nectarines, Pears, Sweet cherries, Papayas, Mangos, Apricots

Fresh Litchi “nuts”, Sweet plums, Blueberries, Raspberries, Blackberries, Mulberries, Huckleberries, Cherimoyas

Some grapes (neither sweet nor sour), Some unusual or tropical fruits not listed.

Acid fruits

Oranges, Grapefruit, Pineapples, Strawberries, Pomegranates, Lemons, Kiwi fruit, Kumquats, Loquats, Carambolas

Loganberries, Gooseberries

Cranberries (not recommended—they contain benzoic acid)

Limes Sour apples Sour grapes Sour peaches Sour nectarines Sour plums Sour cherries

Tomatoes—acid fruit, without the sugar content of other acid fruits. Used with vegetable salad or any green or nonstarchy vegetables, but not at a starch meal. May be used with nuts or cheese, but not with meat, milk or eggs. Some unusual or tropical fruits are not listed—acid (or sour) taste is a good indication of its classification.

Melons

Watermelon, Honeydew melon, Honey balls, Cantaloupe, Muskmelon, Casaba melon, Crenshaw melon, Pie melon

Banana melon, Persian melon, Christmas melon, Nutmeg melon

Syrups and sugars

Brown sugar, “Raw” sugar, White sugar, Milk sugar, Maplesyrup, Cane syrup, Corn syrup, Honey

None of these substances are recommended.

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